Small jar and cover with decoration of chrysanthemums, cranes, and clouds, late 13th century, stoneware with gold and inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Oil bottle with decoration of peonies and chrysanthemums, 13th century, stoneware with copper-red and inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Maebyeong with decoration of cranes and clouds, late 13th century, stoneware with inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Arhat, 13th–14th century, stoneware with iron-brown decoration under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Oil bottle with decoration of peony leaves, late 12th century, stoneware with reverse-inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Box from Set of Five with Decoration of Cranes and Clouds, 13th–14th century, stoneware with inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
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Presented by
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
New York, New York, USA
www.metmuseum.org

The Met presents over 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in three iconic sites in New York City—The Met Fifth Avenue, The Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters. Millions of people also take part in The Met experience online. Since it was founded in 1870, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum’s galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing both new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures.

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Small jar and cover with decoration of chrysanthemums, cranes, and clouds, late 13th century, stoneware with gold and inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Oil bottle with decoration of peonies and chrysanthemums, 13th century, stoneware with copper-red and inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Maebyeong with decoration of cranes and clouds, late 13th century, stoneware with inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Arhat, 13th–14th century, stoneware with iron-brown decoration under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Oil bottle with decoration of peony leaves, late 12th century, stoneware with reverse-inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.
Box from Set of Five with Decoration of Cranes and Clouds, 13th–14th century, stoneware with inlaid design under celadon glaze. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, USA.

Korean Buncheong Ceramics

Goryeo celadon explored

 

Sensuous, whimsical, sophisticated, rustic, and masterful, buncheong ceramics emerged in Korea at the end of the fourteenth century. This breathtakingly diverse expression grew out of inlaid celadon, the celebrated aristocratic stoneware synonymous with the Goryeo period (1918–1392). During the nearly two centuries of its production, buncheong would be increasingly taken up by regional potters, who reveled in the newfound freedom to shape and decorate the adaptable stoneware with unprecedented wit, imagination, and insight.

The early Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) was a time of unparalleled creativity and cultural expansiveness. Buncheong came into its own, bringing inventive changes to traditional forms, while its bold new decorative techniques and motifs responded to consumer preferences and facilitated mass production. At the same time, buncheong flaunted its materiality—the tactile, often uneven appearance that set it apart from the more refined ceramics of the court.

In the wake of the Japanese invasions of Korea at the end of the sixteenth century, buncheong, adopted by Japanese tea connoisseurs, would inspire generations of Japanese potters. In the twentieth century, Korean artists rediscovered their heritage, intrigued by the medium’s visibly handmade aesthetic. Twenty-first-century readers will be struck by the familiar yet refreshing quality of many of these vessels, which recall the force of modernist gestural pieces and more recent abstract expressions.

An original and perceptive exploration of a phenomenon unique in the history of art, Korean Buncheong Ceramics presents together for the first time early Joseon buncheong ware, Edo-period Japanese reinterpretations, and modern and contemporary works that revitalize this dynamic tradition.

Presented by
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
New York, New York, USA
www.metmuseum.org

The Met presents over 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in three iconic sites in New York City—The Met Fifth Avenue, The Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters. Millions of people also take part in The Met experience online. Since it was founded in 1870, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum’s galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing both new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures.

Powered by logo-met-sm

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