Zhang Xiaogang, 2007 - Big Family, 2007, oil on canvas. 36 7/10 × 51 3/5 inches (93.3 × 131 cm). Beijing Commune, Beijing, China.
Zhang Xiaogang, Bloodline Series: Family Portrait, Comrades, 2005, oil on canvas. 47 1/5 × 59 1/10 inches (120 × 150 cm). Ben Brown Fine Arts, London, UK.
Zhang Xiaogang, Big Family - 2008, 2008, silkscreen print, edition of 58. Beijing Commune, Beijing, China.
Zhang Xiaogang, Businessman, Student, Soldier, Farmer, Worker, 2008, cast copper. Various sizes. Pace Gallery, New York, New York, USA.
Zhang Xiaogang, Bloodline — Big Family No. 2, 1996, oil on canvas. Asian Art Archive, Hong Kong, China.
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Presented by
Asian Art Archive
Hong Kong, China
www.aaa.org.hk

AAA was initiated in 2000 in response to the urgent need to document and secure the multiple recent histories of contemporary art in the region. With an international Board of Directors, an Advisory Board made up of noted curators and critics, and research posts in the region, AAA has collated one of the most valuable collections of material on contemporary art in the region. Built of 85% donated material, the collection now holds over 50,000 records, comprised of hundreds of thousands of physical and digital items, and it continues to grow.

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Zhang Xiaogang, 2007 - Big Family, 2007, oil on canvas. 36 7/10 × 51 3/5 inches (93.3 × 131 cm). Beijing Commune, Beijing, China.
Zhang Xiaogang, Bloodline Series: Family Portrait, Comrades, 2005, oil on canvas. 47 1/5 × 59 1/10 inches (120 × 150 cm). Ben Brown Fine Arts, London, UK.
Zhang Xiaogang, Big Family - 2008, 2008, silkscreen print, edition of 58. Beijing Commune, Beijing, China.
Zhang Xiaogang, Businessman, Student, Soldier, Farmer, Worker, 2008, cast copper. Various sizes. Pace Gallery, New York, New York, USA.
Zhang Xiaogang, Bloodline — Big Family No. 2, 1996, oil on canvas. Asian Art Archive, Hong Kong, China.

Zhang Xiaogang

Bloodlines: The Big Family

 

Relying on memory to recreate a highly personal version of his country’s history, Zhang Xiaogang makes art that is as much about himself as it is about China’s past. The grim imaginary families in his Bloodlines: The Big Family paintings of the 1990s and his 2005–06 series of grisaille portraits in oil reveal countless narratives about the aspirations and failures of the Cultural Revolution as well as Zhang’s own emotions. Like the blank visages of the individuals in these paintings, Zhang’s brass and concrete sculptures of figures, as well as implements used for recording history (such as fountain pens, notebooks, and light bulbs, all 2009), appear compressed and distorted by memory, age, and some unknown force.

Presented by
Asian Art Archive
Hong Kong, China
www.aaa.org.hk

AAA was initiated in 2000 in response to the urgent need to document and secure the multiple recent histories of contemporary art in the region. With an international Board of Directors, an Advisory Board made up of noted curators and critics, and research posts in the region, AAA has collated one of the most valuable collections of material on contemporary art in the region. Built of 85% donated material, the collection now holds over 50,000 records, comprised of hundreds of thousands of physical and digital items, and it continues to grow.

Powered by logo-AAA

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